Unicom opens new data center in Hong Kong

The company expands its international presence with its first data center outside mainland China

Unicom opened its first and largest data center in Hong Kong last week. It is the company’s first in terms of data center locations outside mainland China.

The data center is known as the ICT Global Center and has been under construction since 2014. It has been built over 41,000 square meters of land and is networking over 3,000 servers.

The new data center is considered as the company’s attempt at expanding their international presence as well as furthering Hong Kong’s status as a data center hub for the region. The data center is situated in Tseung Kwan O Industrial Estate and is 14,900 square meters with a surrounding construction area of 37,000 square meters. The center also has 4000 data racks and Tier III+ certification.

HaBangNet Shared Hosting

Why HaBangNet DNS system is 100% Reliable and Fast?

HaBangNet is using Anycast DNS Setup, is a network addressing and routing methodology in which datagrams from a single sender are routed to the topologically nearest node in a group of potential receivers, though it may be sent to several nodes, all identified by the same destination address.

Currently HaBangNet is build from 5 different location server.

2 USA, 1 Asia, 1 UK and 1 Germany.

Addressing methods

The Internet Protocol and other network addressing systems recognize five main addressing methodologies:

  • Anycast addressing uses a one-to-nearest association, datagrams are routed to a single member of a group of potential receivers that are all identified by the same destination address.
  • Broadcast addressing uses a one-to-many association, datagrams are routed from a single sender to multiple endpoints simultaneously in a single transmission. The network automatically replicates datagrams as needed for all network segments (links) that contain an eligible receiver.
  • Multicast addressing uses a one-to-unique many association, datagrams are routed from a single sender to multiple selected endpoints simultaneously in a single transmission.
  • Unicast addressing uses a one-to-one association between destination address and network endpoint: each destination address uniquely identifies a single receiver endpoint.
  • Geocast refers to the delivery of information to a group of destinations in a network identified by their geographical locations. It is a specialized form of Multicast addressing used by some routing protocols for mobile ad hoc networks.


Anycast allows any operator whose routing information is accepted by an intermediate router to hijack any packets intended for the anycast address. While this at first sight appears insecure, it is no different from the routing of ordinary IP packets, and no more or less secure. As with conventional IP routing, careful filtering of who is and is not allowed to propagate route announcements is crucial to prevent man-in-the-middle or blackhole attacks. The former can also be prevented by encrypting and authenticating messages, such as using Transport Layer Security, while the latter can be frustrated by onion routing.


Anycast is normally highly reliable, as it can provide automatic failover. Anycast applications typically feature external “heartbeat” monitoring of the server’s function, and withdraw the route announcement if the server fails. In some cases this is done by the actual servers announcing the anycast prefix to the router over OSPF or another IGP. If the servers die, the router will automatically withdraw the announcement.

“Heartbeat” functionality is important because, if the announcement continues for a failed server, the server will act as a “black hole” for nearby clients; this failure mode is the most serious mode of failure for an anycast system. Even in this event, this kind of failure will only cause a total failure for clients that are closer to this server than any other, and will not cause a global failure.

Local and global nodes

Some anycast deployments on the Internet distinguish between local and global nodes to benefit the local community, by addressing local nodes preferentially. An example is the Domain Name System. Local nodes are often announced with the no-export BGP community to prevent hosts from announcing them to their peers, i.e. the announcement is kept in the local area. Where both local and global nodes are deployed, the announcements from global nodes are often AS prepended (i.e. the AS is added a few more times) to make the path longer so that a local node announcement is preferred over a global node announcement.

All HaBangNet Webhosting is covered by our Anycast DNS.

What is High Availability?

High Availability is a term used to describe the procedures, infrastructure, and system design to ensure a specified level of accessibility to your server. Accessibility requires both power and network connectivity as well as a functional server. If one or all of these requirements are compromised, it is said to be unavailable. This level of availability is most often specified in a Service Level Agreement (SLA). Usually a set amount of credits is issued if the provider were to fail to meet the agreement. The amount of credits as well as the level of availability can vary from provider to provider. The typical metric used to describe a high availability service is in percentage of availability.

A table showing the amount of downtime allowable based on a typical availability percentage is shown below.

Availability % Downtime per year Downtime per month* Downtime per week
98% 7.30 days 14.4 hours 3.36 hours
99% 3.65 days 7.20 hours 1.68 hours
99.5% 1.83 days 3.60 hours 50.4 minutes
99.8% 17.5 hours 86.2 minutes 20.1 minutes
99.9% (“three nines”) 8.76 hours 43.2 minutes 10.1 minutes
99.99% (“four nines”) 52.6 minutes 4.32 minutes 1.01 minutes
99.999% (“five nines”) 5.26 minutes 25.9 seconds 6.05 seconds
99.9999% (“six nines”) 31.5 seconds 2.59 seconds 0.605 seconds

* Month calculation is based on a standard 30 day calendar month.

As you can see the difference between 99.9% (3 nines) and 99.99% (4 nines) is quite significant. Most business can live with a chance of a 1 minute per week of downtime but when you start to gamble with 10 minutes of downtime every week that may come during peak hours, you could be putting your business in significant financial risk. With each extra 9, you cut your downtime by 10 times the original amount.

What does this mean for your server?

It can mean that not all “high availability” services are equal. The term is used widely for various levels of availability so it is crucial that you ask your provider exactly what percentage you’re paying for, as well as the steps in place to ensure that level of availability is met. Depending on the SLA, you can obtain service credits when a availability agreement is not fulfilled but most companies would much rather have their servers up then get service credits so it is important to ask several questions about their high availability environment before entering into a contract.

What is a High Availability Environment?

A high availability environment is the infrastructure and procedures put into place to ensure a high level of availability. This is usually accomplished by setting up an environment that includes no single points of failure. What does this mean? It means that if one aspect of the architecture were to fail, there is an additional connection in place to be used, and therefore no disruption to the accessibility of the server. It also means that multiple things must go wrong in order for a server to lose availability and therefore greatly decreasing the chances of downtime. Redundant power supply and redundant network connections are a must for certification of a top tier data center and for a high availability configuration. This will ensure that power and network connectivity are provided with a very low chance of interruption.

How does this work?


This is a configuration that HaBangNet uses and as you can see, there are a lot of things going on. On the power side, there are two separate, independent power runs from the server to the utility power source and backup generators are in place to deliver power to two separate power supplies on the server. On the network side, two core routers are fed from multiple Internet Service Providers and cross-messed between both routers and network access switches. It also should be noted that it is important that your network connections have multiple entry points to your data center and that each ISP is on a separate fiber to further mitigate the risk of downtime. This is just one “high availability” configuration, but a very good one at ensuring reliable access to both power and internet connectivity.

If your interested in more information about this particular configuration, you can read this white paper on The Anatomy of a High-Availability Rack.

In addition to power and network redundancy, a high availability environment can be further protected from loss of availability by protecting against server-side failures. This is often referred to as a high availability cluster which can be paired with load balancing as well for a higher performing configuration. This is done very similarly to high available power and network configurations but having a redundant server connected as well. This cluster configuration can recognize a hardware or software fault in the server and failover to the redundant server without an interruption in service. Load balancing, taking advantage of the high availability cluster, can distribute your application’s workload evenly or asymmetrically (if configured that way) between two or more servers to help increase performance.

An example of a simple cluster configuration (a node 2 cluster) can be seen below.


A data center technician can work with you to configure a server environment that will suit your particular needs. This type of configuration is ideal for servers that can’t afford downtime even when it is scheduled maintenance downtime. Preventative maintenance is critical to limiting server-side downtime but unfortunately, downtime is normally required for the maintenance to be performed. A high availability cluster enables your service to be available even during maintenance.

The last issue to tackle when talking about high availability hosting is what happens when a catastrophic disaster (whether natural like a fire, flood, earthquake or tornado or a man-made disasters like human error accidents, burglaries, and even war-related attacks) strikes.

Managing the risk of a disaster in a high availability configuration.

If a disaster were to strike like a massive earthquake and your data center and server(s) were damaged, it wouldn’t really matter if there was a high availability configuration to your server because of the multiple failure points that usually coincide with a major disaster. That is why it is important, as apart of your disaster recovery plan, to at least have your data backed up and in some cases, consider replication services so that your data is continually replicated to an off-site server and can be accessed in the event of a disaster. Connectivity across multiple data centers can add that additional level of availability if a disaster were to strike. On-site as well as off-site replication are options that you should consider when selecting a high availability host. It is important to note that something like disk mirroring and replication services when fully synchronized are not the same thing as disk backup. These services don’t protect against things like accidental deletion or human-error types of data loss. They protect against disk failure or server failure. Setting up regular online or tape backup procedures is an important consideration, in addition to data replication, to protect against disasters.


As you can see, there are many things to consider when choosing a high availability host and depending on your application and your budget there are various levels of protection against downtime that you can choose from. This article was meant to give a brief overview of the topic of high availability hosting and the importance of knowing which types of redundancy are in place for your server. If you are interested in more detailed descriptions of the options available for your high availability configuration see the links below.

See Also

What is CDN? And why you don’t need it at HaBangNet

A content delivery network or content distribution network (CDN) is a globally distributed network of proxy servers deployed in multiple data centers. The goal of a CDN is to serve content to end-users with high availability and high performance. CDNs serve a large fraction of the Internet content today, including web objects (text, graphics and scripts), downloadable objects (media files, software, documents), applications (e-commerce, portals), live streaming media, on-demand streaming media, and social networks.

Content providers such as media companies and e-commerce vendors pay CDN operators to deliver their content to their audience of end-users. In turn, a CDN pays ISPs, carriers, and network operators for hosting its servers in their data centers. Besides better performance and availability, CDNs also offload the traffic served directly from the content provider’s origin infrastructure, resulting in possible cost savings for the content provider.[1] In addition, CDNs provide the content provider a degree of protection from DoS attacks by using their large distributed server infrastructure to absorb the attack traffic. While most early CDNs served content using dedicated servers owned and operated by the CDN, there is a recent trend[2] to use a hybrid model that uses P2P technology. In the hybrid model, content is served using both dedicated servers and other peer-user-owned computers as applicable.

And why do HaBangNet Hosting customer do not need it?

The answer is simple, because HaBangNet using 1 website to 3 different locations server. Which mean, content on your website is store on 3 different location. Asia, USA and Europe.

So if your user from Europe surfing your website, the “Call” from our anycast dns system will auto point your user to your wesbite content located at the nearest range.

And by default all customer website is protected with HaBangNet DDoS Protection up to 10Gbps at no extra cost.

More information on HaBangNet Global Web Hosting Services, visit here –

Why you need a China hosting for China 13 Billions Internet Users Market

Website hosted at a China base server, your website will not be blocked. Only foreign hosted websites are blocked by the great firewall. The great firewall applies only to international connections from/to China and as such has no effect on locally hosted websites. If your site is hosted within China and happens to break the law, the government will instruct the datacenter to take down your website (or the whole server), there is no need for them to block the site. The whole point of the great firewall is to prevent access to websites hosted on servers on which the Chinese government has no control (servers physically located overseas).

China Webhosting Service by HaBangNet will be hosted at Beijing, China Datacenter can be located at

All China Hosting will be up within 24 hours upon verify and confirm.

Site Publisher is available inside cPanel

cPanel, Inc. has released cPanel & WHM software version 56, which is now available in the STABLE tier.

Introducing Site Publisher
Hosting customer can now get their website up and running with Site Publisher, an easy-to-use static web page generator. With 3 templates to choose from, and the ability to build your own, give your customers an immediate web presence with just a few clicks from their cPanel dashboard.



The Differences of Xen and OpenVZ

This article is to provide a little insight into the difference between OpenVZ and Xen, two very popular but somewhat different virtualization technologies. Ultimately, as with choosing between a Linux or Windows server, you will need to think about the applications you will be running to decide whether OpenVZ or Xen will be a better fit for them. Below is a brief overview of some of the key differences between these two platforms.

The slightly more reliable virtualization software is Xen, a para-virtualization platform that creates VPS with almost exactly the same characteristics as dedicated servers. A Xen VPS will run its own isolated kernel, load its own kernel modules, use fully dedicated virtualized memory, I/O and scheduler, and will be just as stable and customizable as a dedicated server. For a small premium, you’ll never know that you’re only using a virtual server.

OpenVZ, on the other hand, is an operating-system-level virtualization platform that works in much the same way, but provides only a thin layer of virtualization on top of the underlying OS. All VPS on an OpenVZ node will share the same core Linux kernel–this is why OpenVZ only supports Linux systems–, and, consequently, will also suffer alike from issues like kernel crashes. Despite these small drawbacks, OpenVZ VPS are more cost-effective, easier to understand, and are usually much more effective than Xen as cheap VPS, due to having the extra resources available that a Xen VPS would be using to run its completely isolated environment.

Certainly, these are not the only differences between the two platforms, but they are some of the most significant:

Main Features of OpenVZ Virtualization:
Full root access.
OS-level virtualization.
‘Burst’ RAM and other extra resources available when nodes are underused.
Upgrades can be applied on-the-fly, without reboots.
More resources available due to lightweight virtualization.
Simple network and disk setup.
Access to most iptables modules.

Main Features of Xen Virtualization:
Full root access.
Supports Linux and Windows.
Better Java performance.
Resources (RAM, etc) are fully dedicated and private.
Para-virtualized Linux kernel (i.e., full isolation).
Direct access to loadable kernel modules.
Swap space.
Highly configurable.

If you are unsure which platform would be better for you, an OpenVZ VPS will most likely be an easier and more cost-effective solution, unless you already know that you will require specific kernel modules that OpenVZ does not support.


VPS Hosting Service provided by HaBangNet –

XEN VPS Hosting offer –

West coast datacenters with good connectivity to mainland China?

This is a wrong idea. As people outside China, do not aware how China ISP work.

Whether you sign-up for a west coast or any other location server in USA, the speed to China make no different, especially during mid to end of each month, China ISP connection to USA speed even more slower than in the begining of the month. This is a serious problem that happen to every internet users in China. Before China government pushing the local ISP to increase speed and reduce cost for every home user connection to increase the users for Internet Connection in China, the speed for international bandwdith still ok, but after all ISP in China, increase the speed to 50M or 100M internet connection (You can only get this speed if the server was hosted in China), but reduce the speed to international bandwidth (outside China network). Which mean, if your server is located inside China, the internet users can get full speed, but if your server was outside China, max connection to the outside China network, the speed is only from 1Mbps to 2Mbps, sometime during perk hours, I think even 1Mbps also can’t get. So make no different which part of USA server you get, even if the provider got so called “China direct bandwidth” or “Asian Optimized bandwidth”, doesn’t mean you speed will be good.

So if you really want to have good speed to China, Hong Kong will be the best selection than any other country. If not, best option will be using a China Hosting.

If you got staff in China, why not get a China server directly, filling for ICP is very simple and fast, although the ICP department mention is approval within 21 working days, but at most case, the ICP number is provided within 3-7 working days. As long as your china staff is local with China National ID (exclude Taiwan and Hong Kong), then there is no problem applying for the ICP. For the further requirement, will base on your staff National ID issued from which part of the China province, as different Province ICP Department in China, got different requirement. eg. if your office is in Beijing but company registered in Shenzhen, your ICP department will need to be in Shenzhen ICP department handle it and not Beijing ICP department. And if filling under personal and not under company, the process is the same, only thing for Company filling, require company registered detail and a copy of the registered certificate in China (exclude Taiwan and Hong Kong is not allowed).

Don’t listen to people mention so called “China direct bandwidth” or “Asian Optimized bandwidth”. It just a marketing or sales static for people who do not understand about China Internet Network.

FTP Connection Error : Error loading directory?

We notice, since the latest cpanel update, there is a number of people using VPS or Dedicated Server with cPanel encounter this issue.

Please follow these step to solve it, if you’re a managed VPS or Server with HaBangNet, please submit a ticket to support. And we will fix it for you.

What is described looks like the customer is using passive-mode FTP and a port range is not open in the firewall to match the port range used by the FTP service. There are two options to fix this:

  • Use active-mode FTP instead of passive. This is normally selectable in the FTP client. In the command-line FTP client, you can simply type “passive” to toggle passive/active mode.
  • Configure a port range for passive-mode FTP in the FTP service configuration, and configure the server’s firewall to match.

The second option has been covered extensively in this forum, as it is a very common issue. I found the following threads that should help:

If you are using Pure-FTPd, which is the default, you can define the passive-mode port range by editing /etc/pure-ftpd.conf and uncommenting the following directive:

# Port range for passive connections replies. - for firewalling.

# PassivePortRange          30000 50000

Once you have removed the hash mark (#) from the line starting with “PassivePortRange”, restart Pure-FTPd and edit your firewall configuration to allow traffic on the same port range.


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